Sounding Board

Glamping Is an Emotional Reset We All Need To Experience

Camping, glamping, getting away from my computer, my stress, my pure anxiety ridden corpse—didn’t seem like something I needed but oh boy, won’t this essay be a testament to getting away. When the beginning of the pandemic happened (and even before), working from home felt like a novelty—like going to Grandma’s house where you know […]

Gay Code: How Overt Labels Still Hinder Any Progress in LGBTQ Spaces

Half of our amazing staff is LGBTQ and we love it, what we don’t love is the code words inner circle LGBTQ use to define their space. Much like our past posts on femininity and bi-curiousness, let’s have a chat about the enigma of “fabulous” shepards words.  What do I love about being a Queer […]

I Don’t Want To Eat Because Ultimately I Don’t Have The Money

I don’t blame the city—we live in a capitalist society that makes or breaks a person’s will / bank account. So where did I find the middle? I just didn’t eat. Where budget planning goes way way way wrong—I used my excuse of living “in one of the most expensive cities in the world” to […]

Till Open Relationship Does Us Part: Are We In The Age Of Open Doors?

Our grandparents didn’t date like millennials do now? Are we seeing a trend that will fade away or the new age American signs of commitment? In the come ups of dating culture whether in a city setting or neighboring, we have the problematic luxury of dating as we see fit. Monogamous, polyamorous, no-strings-attached, and the […]

Why I Decided to Address My Coffee Codependency During The Pandemic

“Hi, my names Matt. And I’m a coffee addict.” I began noticing coffee had become more than just a morning ritual earlier this year. Steeping and steaming cup after cup of piping-hot, soil-colored gold in thee wee-hours of the morning had begun to lost its inherent sheen; the whole process, like the things around it, […]

Yes, All Women: A Collection of Unwanted Passes

Today I learnt the news that the remains of Sarah Everard, the Londoner who went missing walking home from her friend’s house, were found. It was a discovery that left my friends and I reeling, devastated for her family and loved ones, cataloguing the times we have been put in dangerous situations by men. I […]

Un-Glamourizing Breast Cancer: A Daughters Recount Of Her Mothers Survival

We’ve come to the month of pink. One single stereotypically female attached color represents a disease that causes a heartbreaking amount of anguish and pain. Brands release themed, limited edition products benefiting their choice of non-profit, random campaigns rear their heads again while using debatably sexist tactics to gain attention, from “I Love Boobies” to […]

Immigrants Like Me Will Be Crucial to Economic Recovery

As a teenager in Senegal, West Africa, I grew up watching American sitcoms like Beverly Hills 90210, and lots of MTV. The television version of the American Dream was beautiful, overflowing with fun and opportunity. What young Senegalese youth wouldn’t want to exchange French colonial rule for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness in […]

An Open Letter To My (and Everyone’s) Filipino Elders: Black Lives Matter To Us

Titos (uncles), titas (aunts), kuyas (older brothers), ates (older sisters), nanays (moms), and tatays (dads), and to my peers who have been silent. Your silence is deafening. For people who are so tight knit as a family and as a community, where are you now that we: your sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, adings (younger sibling) […]

Fiction: The Birth Of Presidency—“The Mother for Trump”

How a mother taught her daughter the forms and fiction of this year’s Presidential election. Emma spoke in soft, pastel tones, a cadence she continued to carry into her early-forties. “Don’t you think the lawn looks healthier this year then the last,” she doted, spearing the topsoil with a pronged shaped piece of silver steel. […]

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